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Author Topic: Trees that will coppice
Chilterns
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Post Trees that will coppice
on: May 17, 2012, 05:40
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Hi,

I would be interested to know just what trees will coppice ?

Some are well known to be able to grow back from the stump includng hazel, willow, alder, elder, oak (young), ash, beech (pollarding above browse height is better), sweet chestnut, hornbeam, lime (pry), hawthorn, blackthorn, etc. but others have a tendancy to spread out and grow back through a process of root suckering especially elm and cherry though I am currently watching cherry grow back from the stumps of 2 trees felled last summer.

Would it be better for our woodlands if we were to encourage this method of woodland management thereby saving on replanting time, cost and effort ?

What tips do others have and especially about cost effective methods of protecting regrowth from browsing damage ?

Chilterns

Secretary
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Post Re: Trees that will coppice
on: August 28, 2012, 21:28
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Hello Chilterns,

They may not be popular but sycamores seem to coppice nicely. We dropped a row of them about two years ago and the regrowth is pretty thick.

As for the browsing. Deer prefer new bramble shoots, but they are just as happy on willow or hazel regrowth, they had a good go at the sycamores as well although I'm not sure that is typical. After numerous coversations with woodland owners, the only thing I've heard that seems to work reliably is culling. Fencing is expensive, it needs to be robust enough to stop muntjac and badgers and high enough to stop roe ( 7ft ?) , and the impression that I get is that it only seems to last about three years before something punches a hole in it and exposes all the tasty protected trees to hordes of hungry deer. Eventually everyone seems to come to the conclusion that the only answer is to control the numbers, and the best way of doing that is to enlist your local stalker.

We had trouble about four years ago when a stand of hazel coppice was cut. After years of no problems the deer (both muntjac and roe) seemed to hit critical mass and destroyed about half an acre by browsing the regrowth. After the first year of heavy culling the next block of hazel cut took a mauling but survived, after two more years of heavy culling the deer numbers fell to the point where the hazel regrowth is virtually undamaged. Funnily enough with this year being so wet the stalkers haven't been out as often and deer numbers seem to have recovered remarkably quickly, there's been no damage yet, but if the winter cull isn't good then I'm predicting trouble for next years coppice.

Secretary

Chilterns
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Post Re: Trees that will coppice
on: June 19, 2013, 09:24
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Following the recent felling of a large ash tree a couple of young (45 year old) wytch elm trees were pushed over and as a result were cut off at the base. The butt logs yielded very nice straight grained creamy white timber that was cleaved into quarters for the production of Windsor chair legs by Derrick Dunthorne with the remainder ending up in the firewood pile.

Now that summer is here I note that these elm stumps have sprouted rather healthily.

Image

Doubtless the deer will browse off this coppice regrowth once they find it however, following the advice received from the OWG secretary above I am now allowing a bramble patch to develope and hopefully this will provide the deer with a preferential feeding area.

Since my last post I have discovered that Wytch Elm (unlike English Elm) does not grow from root suckers, instead growing only from seed and hence as such roots of individual trees within a hedgerow are therefore not interconnected thus hopefully this should help provide better insurance from total loss due to Dutch Elm disease.

The stumps of these Wytch elm trees are known to contain 45 growth rings and so this would equate to a germination date of about 1968 which is a good 5-6 years before the major outbreak of Dutch Elm disease in the early - mid 70's. Possibly these trees are more resistant to Dutch elm disease than those that were lost and I wonder if this might possibly provide a species recovery example that supports the current strategy being put in place to counter the effects of Chalara Fraxinea in ash trees.

Chilterns

Chilterns
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Post Re: Trees that will coppice
on: August 2, 2013, 21:27
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Unfortunately by the beginning of August 2013 the deer have found the Wytch elm coppice regrowth and have nibbled all of the growing tips.

Image

This kind of damage is quite disheartening but not entirely unexpected.

Chilterns

Chilterns
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Post Re: Trees that will coppice
on: January 12, 2014, 13:57
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A few branches were placed around and on top off the Wytch Elm regrowth and by late September this had once again shot up.

Image

Deer don't like to risk getting their legs caught in piles of loose branches.

Chilterns

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